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WE NEED YOUR INPUT!

The ongoing transit study is being done to address population and traffic projections for 2050, since we know we won’t be able to rely on cars alone to keep people moving between Sugar House, South Salt Lake, Millcreek and Holladay in the future.

Based on initial public feedback and transportation priorities identified by our partnering cities, the transit study team has analyzed four types of transit options along two routes.  

Please review these transit options and complete the survey at the end to help determine the final study recommendation. You have through April 22 to provide feedback.  

Scroll down to get started! 

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POTENTIAL TRANSIT LOCATIONS

Each of the two routes, 1300 East and Highland Drive, connects Sugar House, Millcreek and Holladay, and is a vibrant part of these communities. A new transit solution on either route will improve the connection between the cities and provide more accessible and sustainable transportation options for all users in the future. Note that both potential alignments begin south of 2100 South on Highland Drive and split just south of 2700 South (see map).

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WHAT DO THESE ROADS LOOK LIKE NOW?

Both corridors are densely populated with a mix of commercial and residential properties. 1300 East currently has one travel lane in each direction, with a center turn lane and shoulders and sidewalks on each side. Highland Drive currently has two lanes of traffic in each direction, with a center turn lane and sidewalks on each side.

 

The partnering cities plan to continually develop each corridor over the coming years with Millcreek building a new city center and Holladay developing the old Cottonwood Mall site. Check out each city’s website for more information on these efforts (Millcreek and Holladay). 

1300 EAST

HIGHLAND DRIVE

These graphics depict typical cross sections of 1300 East and Highland Drive. Some segments of each road may vary.

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What transit options are possible?
Streetcar

Streetcars are rail transit vehicles designed for local transportation on a city street, and powered by overhead electricity. They share a lane with vehicles.

Light Rail

Light rail is a passenger train that requires its own tracks and a separation from vehicle traffic.

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)

BRT is a bus-based transit system that includes a dedicated travel lane (separate from vehicles), traffic signal priority and enhanced stops or stations.

Enhanced Bus

Enhanced bus runs more frequently than the existing bus line with a limited number of stops. It is not separated from traffic.

 
 
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HOW DO THESE TRANSIT OPTIONS COMPARE?

Here’s a look at how the 1300 East and Highland Drive options compare to one another in construction and long-term benefits.

Graphic showing a look at how the 1300 East and Highland Drive options compare to one another in construction and long-term benefits.
 
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HOW DO THESE OPTIONS IMPACT PROPERTY?

Most of these potential transit options would require more space than is already available along 1300 East and Highland Drive. The study team has estimated approximately how many properties would likely need to be purchased in order to implement each option*.

Graphic showing how Most of these potential transit options would require more space than is already available along 1300 East and Highland Drive. The study team has estimated approximately how many properties would likely need to be purchased in order to implement each option*.
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Graphic showing how We wanted to see how many more people we could move with each transit option compared to adding a new lane for vehicles. We learned each transit option can move significantly more people than an individual car can, and would reduce traffic congestion and travel times in 2050.
HOW MANY PEOPLE CAN EACH TRANSIT OPTION MOVE?

We wanted to see how many more people we could move with each transit option compared to adding a new lane for vehicles. We learned each transit option can move significantly more people than an individual car can, and would reduce traffic congestion and travel times in 2050.

​HOW MANY PEOPLE PER DAY IN 2050 WOULD USE EACH TRANSIT OPTION?

Study projections show that in 2050 light rail would bring in the most riders on either 1300 East or Highland Drive, while Streetcar would serve the fewest on 1300 East and enhanced bus on Highland Drive.

Graphic showing how the Study projections show that in 2050 light rail would bring in the most riders on either 1300 East or Highland Drive, while Streetcar would serve the fewest on 1300 East and enhanced bus on Highland Drive.
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HOW WOULD EACH OPTION AFFECT AIR QUALITY IN 2050? 

Our partnering cities are committed to reduce local air pollution through transit, so as one part of that, the Local Link team has compared carbon emissions savings over 25 years for each option. With more individuals using these transit options in 2050, fewer cars would be on the road and individual vehicle emissions would be reduced. Reduced air pollution is one component in improving air quality in the Wasatch Front and addressing long-term climate change.

HOW MUCH WOULD EACH OPTION COST? 

It’s important to each city that the selected transit solution is affordable, feasible to construct and works collectively for all of the cities.

The study team has gathered past project costs and future construction costs to come up with an estimated range for each transit option. These estimates take into account transit construction, road widening where needed, associated right-of-way costs and operation costs for each option.

Graphic showing how It’s important to each city that the selected transit solution is affordable, feasible to construct and works collectively for all of the cities.  ​  The study team has gathered past project costs and future construction costs to come up with an estimated range for each transit option. These estimates take into account transit construction, road widening where needed, associated right-of-way costs and operation costs for each option.
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HOW WOULD EACH OPTION CHANGE THE EXISTING ROAD? 

These future cross sections, below, show that light rail and BRT would require their own dedicated lanes, while a streetcar would share a lane with traffic. Enhanced bus would not change the existing roads. 

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Now that you’ve reviewed the transit types and routes, let us know what you’d like to see in these communities by taking the transit survey.

Your input is an important part of selecting the final transit recommendation later this spring.

Have more questions before completing the survey?
Please call our hotline at
844-56-STUDY
or email us at info@locallinkstudy.com.